ISIS didn’t radicalize them, they were already radicalized.

muslims-praying-in-the-parkThe mainstream media are unscrupulously promoting their ingenuous utopian view, that all is needed to stop ISIS is to avoid making unpleasant criticisms on social media, and for western society to refrain from being so ‘Islamophobic’. Unfortunately the majority of individuals are swallowing this forced medicinal psychosis unsuspectingly. Sunshine, rainbows and unicorns are a much easier sell than the bitter tasting painful medicine of reality.

 The truth of the matter is; members of the Muslim community who decide to join ISIS are already victim to the romanticism of the caliphate and were so long before ISIS came along. This historical romanticism has been rebranded, and is now simply referred to as ‘radicalized’.

 To question this aforementioned romanticism, would be to question Islam itself. To question the totalitarian, oppressive and expansionistic nature of Islamic caliphates would indeed require an inquiry into Islam itself, and also require we bring the topic of the Prophet Muhammad into the mainstream. We all know in the omnipresent climate of political correctness and unsanctioned Islamic blasphemy edicts, this becomes a monumental challenge.

 The romanticism for the caliphate is inherent with Islamic scripture. Western society unwittingly permits the politicisation and introduction of such notions into the Islamic community as contemporary views. Groups such as Hizb ut-Tahrir –established in 1953 – have for decades preached the glory of the caliphate, and they continue freely and unabridged to this day in doing so. Traditional Islamic scripture coupled with contemporary politicisation – by groups like Hizb ut-Tahrir – promoting the Islamic caliphate is nothing new, nothing new at all. The difference now, is we have a group declaring, “this caliphate we all know about, well we have one now.”

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 With fundamental penchants and desires already established, the progression to join the ranks of ISIS is significantly smaller than what the mainstream are able to comprehend.

 What do you think is an easier and lower risk topic for the cowardly mainstream to divert attention; the biography of Muhammad and the history of Islamic caliphates or ‘Islamophobia’ and social media? We certainly know it isn’t Muhammad. The majority of media outlets will not even show a picture of him. Even in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo massacre at the beginning of this year – where 12 innocent people died for the sin of drawing a cartoon of Muhammad – they flatly refused.

 Consequently, due to Islam being granted special category status by western society, the utterly vile and deplorable culture of introspection is introduced whenever Islamic massacres occur.

 Why didn’t we help these people more?
What should we have done to make them feel franchised into society?
What job opportunities should we have created to have helped steer them away from extremism?

 Complimenting this bizarre suicidal culture of unwarranted introspection is the ‘Islamophobia’ myth. It’s the myth for which mainstream popular culture is now completely indoctrinated. It implies than any criticism of Islam whatsoever is a phobia. A phobia is an irrational fear, therefore we are all irrational. This appalling philosophy was elevated to a whole new level recently when Australian journalist Waleed Aly had the sheer audacity and shameless temerity to suggest Australians should, ‘think twice’ before saying something unpleasant on social media, because you’d be giving ISIS, “what they want.”

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 How utterly absurd, irresponsible and dangerous it is to provide the entire inherent historical context of Islamic caliphates and the contemporary politicisation of them a complete exemption from inquiry and criticism. Unfortunately, by refusing to name the religion which apparently has nothing to do with itself, this is exactly what we are doing.

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